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Monday, May 28, 2012

Foiling My Way Through the Empty Nest Syndrome

In the animal kingdom, species that build nests often do so only to shelter the eggs that contain their offspring until they hatch...Though humans spend more time with their young than nest-building birds, there comes a time when avian metaphors begin to apply very aptly to children. We often speak of young adults learning to spread their wings and fly; they go off to college or the military, get married or accept a job cross-country. Whatever the child's flight path, parents are left with an empty place in the home, or as it has been dubbed in the vernacular, the empty nest...

Is one ever really prepared for the empty nest syndrome? Take this morning for example. As I strolled around the garden,

I lingered past the baby robins to get a bird's eye view of how our little friends were doing. The pansies, which up until this time were holding up quite nicely, appeared lifeless. I did a quick back step to get another look when suddenly I was flushed with horror, the nest was empty!

Most definitely, not catching a glimpse of our fleeting friends taking their first flight, will never compare to the wave of emotions that flooded my head the day my daughter Michele told me she was moving to Idaho and yet, I do wish I would have had a chance to wave good-bye to the Robins. Marion didn't take it well either. She has been diligently keeping an eye on the nest each morning in hopes of getting a glance of the first flight. I suppose it is best they spread their wings and flew unnoticed...


With a bit of encouragement from Janet at Dying for Chocolate, I thought it might be interesting to share a rather vintage and unusual seasonal cookbook with you. What makes it vintage is the fact that it was published in 1959 by the Kaiser Aluminum and Chemical Company which was established by American industrialist Henry J. Kaiser in 1946.

What makes it unusual is its texture. Barely 9 pages long, both the front and the back of the booklet are as vibrant as a sheet of aluminum foil. Very cool...

Seasonally speaking, the title of this little gem is How To Become A Cookout Champion; Win with these new Bar-B-Tricks. Clever, no? How about this for a barrel of laughs?

It appears the going rate for Siz Instant Charcoal Lighter in 1959 was 89 cents. Expensive as compared to Ember Coal lighter selling for a mere 49 cents.

Here's a cool advertisement for Squirt Soda apparently "Refreshing Thirsty American's Since 1938."

And what kind of seasonal post would this be without a couple of Hamburger Bar-B-Tricks. After all, it is National Hamburger Day! (It is in Chicago anyway, there are many conflicting dates for Hamburger Day:) Presenting...Carnation Bar-B-Burgers.

And for the sprites, Hamburgers-On-A-Stick

Let's toss a contest in for good measure.

Just for the record, and because I simply can't help myself, Aluminum Foil was invented by a man by the name of Charles Martin Hall, who began experimenting with minerals at the age of 12. He was inspired by his chemistry professor, Frank Fanning Jewett, who said the person who discovered an economical way to produce aluminum would become rich. Charles Martin Hall: aluminum’s "boy wonder" did just that. On April 2, 1889, Charles Martin Hall patented an inexpensive method for the production of aluminum. US patent #400666 described as a "process of electro lyzing crude salts of aluminum. As you may have guessed, I did a rather in depth post about Mr. Hall at my other blog, Tasteful Inventions. (which btw is very neglected these days:) I for one can not imagine a world without aluminum foil, especially on Memorial Day!

“And now the Torch and Poppy red
We wear in honor of our dead.
Fear not that ye have died for naught;
We’ll teach the lesson that ye wrought
In Flanders Fields.”
– from “We Shall Keep the Faith,”

Moine Belle Michael

Resources
1. Empty Next Syndrome Overview
2. In Flanders Fields

43 comments:

  1. Happy start-to-Summer, Louise! I think you can be confident that the robins flew happily because of your watchful eye, even if you weren't present for their first flight. Now, a "men only" cooking contest? How funny. The illustration of the guy at the grill, looks just like my dad in his apron, although he never wore the chefs hat. And, the wheel barrow, lined with foil and serving as a buffet is just brilliant!

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    1. You know T.W. it seems I remember my dad adorning pretty much the same look minus the hat of course:) I LOVE the wheelbarrow too. I think it would make a great addition to a 50's style cook-out! And useful too!

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  2. Beautiful photos and fun images today! I remember paper poppies in my childhood, but the "tradition" is long-since gone...

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    1. Thanks Channon. I think someone should revitalize their existence, Chan. Any ideas, lol...

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  3. oh, what a pity that you missed the little robin's first flight!probably they just didnt want anyone to stare at them making their first flight, they are shy!! LOL! it's interesting to know that people had evaporated milk in making hamburgers.

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    1. I haven't had time to post about it yet, lena but, the Momma robin and baby robin have returned. I've been watching her teach the baby how to "catch" worms. So darn cute!

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  4. Ha! Love that "barrel of laughs"!

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  5. Sorry you missed the babies taking their first flight.
    It was interesting to see the pages from your vintage cookbook. Really has made me hungry already!:-)
    Happy day to you!

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    1. Welcome Nellie! Thanks for dropping by. So glad to read you enjoyed this post. Drop by when ever the notion hits you!

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  6. Well, think of it this way: you saw them born and grow enough to fly on their own. That's pleasure enough. :)
    Love this cookout cookbook. You find the most intriguing things, Louise! Thanks for scanning so many gem photos so we could all enjoy it. Don't you love the Squirt in the watermelon? This was my era, too...my daughter was already a year old. Never saw (or at least I don't remember seeing :) ) this particular cookbook though. We did lots and lots of grilling back then too.
    Fun post!

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    1. Delighted you enjoyed the post, Barbara. That book is one of my favorites and I haven't seen it too often either. Cook outs of this era seem so down to earth. I'd love to host a 50's barbecue for one of my milestone birthdays!!! Thanks for your lovely comments and for dropping by...

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  7. Love that cookbook! Such cool, retro pictures. Really interesting post - thanks.

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    1. It is such a cook booklet isn't it, kitchenriffs. I must say, I'm looking forward to YOUR next cocktail post! Thanks for the kind words. Drop by any ol' time!

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  8. Sorry the birds have flown the nest. I have a nest in a big metal chicken (they enter through the beak), and I see the busy parents all times of day now taking food. I can't see the little birds because they're in the belly of the chicken. Boy does that sound weird.

    Love the aluminum foil cookbook. What a treasure. Of course, that's my dad on the cover. I posted a 'real' photo of him--not barbecuing--but for Memorial Day--on my mystery blog: www.mysteryfanfare.com

    Thanks for all you do.

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    1. I have new news about the birds Janet. I just haven't had the time to post it yet. let's just say, I know for sure one birdie is doing just fine!

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  9. Oh my gosh this was great. I drank Squirt as a kid. The taste kind of grew on me, and it was very refreshing in the summer and I am sure it was delicious in the fruit salad to accompany all the BBQ.

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    1. So glad you enjoyed it, Lou Ann. I'd love to try Squirt sometime!

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  10. Somehow I just can't imagine how those burgers would work when diluted with all that evaporated milk!

    Very nice post!!

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    1. Those recipes seem to be perfect candidates for the regrettable food gallery Mae. That's just my opinion of course:)

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  11. It would have been so nice to see the robins flight my friend but your pictures show that you have so much other beauty surrounding you :D
    Beautiful post!

    Cheers
    Choc Chip Uru

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    1. Thank you, Uru. Your words are greatly appreciated:)

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  12. Love the old cookbook pictures. Takes me right back--except that charcoal lighter--wow that's out of left field for me (actually looks a little scary). Sorry you missed the baby birds first flight. They sure grew up fast; thanks for sharing them with us!

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    1. Oh how I remember the dangers of charcoal lighter, Inger. The thought still scares me but, oh we sure loved toasting marshmallows over the flames!

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  13. aah Louise really love this post and the pictures and draws! Love it:)

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  14. I love the Hamburgers-On-A-Stick!

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    1. Me too, Anney. I know a few kids that would like them too!!!

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  15. I love that wheel barrow of ice. I want to go buy a wheel barrow now just for that. This Spring, we watched the birdies hatch in their nest on the porch. And then we watched them fly away. So cool.

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    1. I've been scouting out the yard sales for a wheel barrow too, Angela. Wish me luck! Let me know if you find one first, lol...

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  16. We have a bird's nest living in our garage!

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  17. Happy day-after Memorial Day! Sorry you didn't get to bid the baby birdies a fond adieu!

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    1. That's okay Marjie. They came back!

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  18. A lovely garden and cute baby birds! A wonderful post.

    Cheers,

    Rosa

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  19. Hi, I am really happy to tell you I have awarded you some... awards :D
    Congrats and check it out here: http://gobakeyourself.wordpress.com/2012/05/30/technical-jargon/

    Cheers
    Choc Chip Uru

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  20. How I enjoyed all your vintage pictures; I remember many of them very well. Your posts are always so much fun. Your blog doesn't appear on my list of blogs I follow anymore; I am still trying to figure that one out. Our baby pigeons finally left, and we weren't too sad, they had taken over my herb pots. Love to come here.
    Rita

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  21. Hi, so glad I found your blog. I was researching a bundt pan that I picked up in a charity store or fifty cents. You had a 2007 post that was most helpful.
    The photos of your garden are lovely and the birds as well. We have many nesting birds on our property. You rarely see them fledge. Mom usually makes sure the coast is clear when they make their debut. I have only seen them fly a couple of times.
    Love the vintage images of cookouts. I really like the wheel barrow cooler. That is timeless.
    I enjoyed myself, I am a new follower.
    Ginger

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  22. Your garden is gorgeous! I'd love to close my eyes and inhale the fragrance of all the blosssoms. And that old cookbook is a hoot...thanks so much for sharing!

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  23. Your flowers are gorgeous! Mixed feelings about the robins? Half expected them to be around, yet it is expected that they will be gone one day! They had a good beginning in the nest at your lovely garden. I would love to take a stroll among the gorgeous blooms in your beautiful garden!!
    A vintage cookbook, interesting indeed! And thank you to CMH for inventing the aluminium foil, one of the greatest and useful item in the kitchen. Thank you Louise, for sharing this info, never knew about this!
    Your daughter is moving to Idaho? All the best to your daughter, you could always visit her and don't forget to bring back some Idaho potatoes!
    Have a lovely weekend!

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  24. So sorry that you & Marion didn't have the chance to see those cute Robin's first flight. But I'm sure they'll be back in your lovely garden singing along admiring your lovely flowers! I love your flowers especially those Poppies! They are so lovely! What an interesting burger recipe with evaporated milk!

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  25. Empty-nest syndrome is the name given to the constellation of feelings many parents have when their last or only child leaves home, and they no longer have a baby “chick” in their nest.I'm really glad to visit here..

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Through this wide opened gate,
none came too early,
none returned too late.

Thanks for dropping in...Louise