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Sunday, November 24, 2013

Cape Cod's Famous Cranberry Recipes

Cape Cod's Famous Cranberry Recipes

We've all heard the story about how the Cranberry got its name. However, was it really because the cranberry blossom resembles the head and bill of a crane, or does the word Cranberry have a German flair to it?

Cranberry Flower

Truth is, a smaller version of the American cranberry grows wild in the bogs and marshes of England, northern Europe, and Siberia, so an unfamiliar plant would not likely have confounded the Pilgrims. In England, the small berry version, Vaccinium oxycoccos, goes by such names as marsh-berry, bog berry, and fen whort, none predominating. In the language known as Low German, it is called the kranebeere, meaning crane-berry. In the event that the Pilgrims were unacquainted with the fruit in England, they surely encountered it during the eleven years they lived in the Netherlands, then the trading center of the world, where the berry grew wild in marshy patches.
They certainly encountered the Low German language. Low German has much in common with Old English. It had been the lingua franca of the medieval Hanseatic Trading League of northern Europe that was still operating in the 1600s, and it was widely spoken along the reaches of the lower Rhine River and the eastern Netherlands, where the Pilgrims lived. It seems far more likely that the Pilgrims used the Low German word that sounds the same in English, krane, for the fruit that they were familiar with from Europe.
In short, the berries may have been named for their resemblance to the crane, but it was the Germans, not the Pilgrims, who noticed the resemblance and applied the word to the European berry. Bogged Down in Cranberries

There are bogs of "stuff" we take for granted about the Cranberry. Since I've discussed a few pops of cranberry trivia in previous posts for Eat A Cranberry Day, which was yesterday, btw, today I would like to share just a few recipes from Cape Cod's Famous Cranberry Recipes published by the folks at Ocean Spray in 1941.

Cranberry sauce was first commercially canned in 1912 by the Cape Cod Cranberry Company, which marketed the product as "Ocean Spray Cape Cod Cranberry Sauce." A merger with other growers evolved into the well-known Ocean Spray corporation now famous for their cranberry products. 1912 Facts and Trivia

There's another reason why I've chosen to share this particular recipe book with you today, Marion. While Marion and I were doing shopping for our Thanksgiving guests, somehow, and believe me, I don't know how, she managed to load our shopping cart with 8, yes, eight cans of Cranberry Sauce! Needless to say, it behooves me to figure out what to do with them all. Granted, we will probably use one can Thursday, maybe two, but that's a big maybe:) I know, I know, it just wouldn't be Thanksgiving with out cranberry sauce but seriously, do the remainder of the cans have to go into storage? Probably:)

Here's a rather novel recipe for Cranberry Avocado Salad. Although, you might like this recipe for Cranberry and Avocado Salad with Candied Spiced Almonds and Sweet White Balsamic Vinaigrette to quench that "friendship" feeling.

Cranberry Avocado Salad

You see these Cranberry Chicken Salad Empanadas? They quickly "set up" with the use of refrigerator pie crust from Pillsbury and a few other "convenience foods."

Cranberry Chicken Salad Empanadas

Or, what about these Jiffy Chicken-Cranberry Salads.

Jiffy Chicken Cranberry Salad

It seems the following recipe for Cranberry Fritters is not all that outdated. I found a similar recipe for Deep-Fried Cranberry Sauce Fritters at the Food Network via Paula Deen. I'm ify on this one unless of course it tastes like a jelly donut!

Cranberry Fritters

Have you guessed why Marion had to buy all those cans of Cranberry Sauce? If you guessed it was because they were fairly inexpensive, you would be correct. There's another reason though. Marion says that during WWII, "the boys over sees," expressed great enthusiasm when they received their Thanksgiving rations that included Cranberry Sauce. She didn't elaborate. This sounds like a pretty thrifty recipe, one we might revisit nowadays:)

Cranberry Pot Roast

It just wouldn't be "proper" not to include an authentic Cape Cod seafood recipe, now would it? Scarlet Sinners anyone?

Scarlet Sinners

Did you know that America’s Bouncing Berry is Wisconsin's state fruit? I knew it was the state fruit of Massachusetts, but I didn't know about Wisconsin.

Cranberry Steamed Pudding

I'm going off course sharing this recipe for Cranberry Steamed Pudding as it doesn't use Cranberry Sauce but rather fresh or frozen whole berries. (don't you love the way cranberries freeze so well? Just like blueberries!) I found it in the Land O Lakes Country Heritage Cookbook published in 1984. I just had to share it because today, according to British tradition, this Sunday, the last Sunday before Advent, is often called Stir-Up Sunday the traditional day for making Christmas Pudding. There are many variations for Christmas Puddings. It seems this recipe is a family tradition.

Cranberry Steamed Pudding

Cranberries require odd conditions to grow and thrive. They do best in bogs, low shallow bowls of acidic peat soil, where plenty of sand and water are available. The composition of a cranberry bog is unique and consists of four layers, clay, gravel, peat and sand in ascending order. Each performs an important function to the overall ability of the bog to thrive. By the turn of the 19th century, residents had staked out their bogs, or “Cranberry Yards,” and families would typically harvest their supplies of the berries from them. Harwich Historical Society: Cranberry Culture

October is National Cranberry Month AND November 23rd is Eat A Cranberry Day!
Check Out My Cranberry Pinterest Board

Resources
1. Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Cranberries
2. The Wetherby Cranberry Library
3. Wisconsin State Cranberry Growers Association
4. Cape Cod Cranberry Growers' Association
5. Stir-up Sunday: Cakes and puddings for Christmas
6. Gidleigh Park’s Gourmet Christmas Pudding
7. My Nan's (Jamie Oliver) Christmas Pud with Vin Santo
8. Eat A Cranberry Day @ Dottie's Family Plus Food Equals Love
9. Eat A Cranberry Day (previous post)

53 comments:

  1. My grandparents made a Jell-O based cranberry salad that I loved. They would grind a bag of fresh cranberries and a few apples in a hand-cranked meat grinder. Then they would add a bit of sugar, canned crushed pineapple, a few oranges with the membranes removed, and stir the whole thing into raspberry Jell-O (made with only the boiling water-- they skipped the step to add cold water). Then grandma would stir in orange juice concentrate to taste and the next day the salad would be ready. I miss it. I know how to make it myself, but it's just not the same and it makes way too much for just me anyway.

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    1. So many versions of Cranberry Jell-O Salad still exist Poppy. It's funny how some dishes can conjure up memories. Cranberry Jell-O Salad has a way of doing that:) There was a recipe for it in this booklet but I figured since it was already so popular I wouldn't include it. Maybe I should have:)

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  2. Eight cans of cranberry?! That will be a challenge to come up with something to do with them. ;-) Those fritters actually sound kind of interesting - not something I'd have thought of in a million years! Probably invented by someone who had 8 cans of cranberry on their shelf. :D Fun post - thanks.

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    1. Very funny, John...Now, I may just have to make those fritters because I too am quite curious. That's one can down, and only 7 more to go.

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  3. So many recipes with cranberries! For me it is a fairly new fruit to use in cooking and I love experimenting with it. I need to "fish" some more good recipes from you here :-) This cranberry steam pudding looks seriously good! X

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    1. Cranberries are a GREAT fruit to experiment with Alida. I can just imagine the goodness you will create! Do share:)

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  4. Cranberries are so versatile fresh or from the can-there are million dishes that can be made. You provided some great opportunities for us with too many cranberries to get started in making some great dishes.

    Happy Thanksgiving to you and your family.

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    1. I suppose with a bit of imagination, Cranberry Sauce could be brought to delicious heights, Velva. You know I'll be playing with some, lol...

      Thank you so much for visiting, Velva. A very Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours too:)

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  5. I love the Turkey look amazing!! But I would be happy to make this cranberry pudding I love it!!
    hugss! xo

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    1. Oh I wish you would make cranberry pudding, Gloria. It does sound so interesting. You are more than welcome to share in Turkey, Gloria. It may not look as "pretty" but it sure will taste yummy:)

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  6. Dear Louise, What a terrific blog post on cranberries! So many delicious recipes to try, I am looking forward to some of these recipes as I love cranberries, anyway, shape, or form! I especially love the Chicken-Cranberry salad recipe! I love the Cape Cod Cranberry Recipes book. Thank you again for a mention of my blog in your post! Enjoy and blessings, Dottie :)

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    1. I'm thinking about that Chicken Cranberry Salad too, Dottie. I saw the cutest serving suggestion on Pinterest. Serve it in a crescent rolled shaped Cornucopia! Thank YOU for covering Eat A Cranberry Day!

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  7. Hi Louise , cranberries is a stable at my house , fresh , frozen and can , there are go many ways to use them and they are also good for your health , we drink lots of cranberry juice at my house , we sure enjoyed your post , thanks for sharing :)

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    1. We drinks lots of cranberry juice too Nee. Marion loves it!

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  8. Dear Louise, I guess you will have cranberry sauce on hand all winter.
    I love the retro pictures. These recipes all sound good, though I am drawn to the cranberry fritters. That sounds real good.

    Have a very Happy and Blessed Thanksgiving to you and all your family.

    Blessings and prayers for a beautiful holiday. Catherine xo

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    1. I guess so Catherine:) That's okay though. I'm sure I'll figure out something, lol...I wish you and your family a glorious Thanksgiving too, Catherine and thank you:)

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  9. I love this post, Louise! I just made my cranberry relish today, but I will still have the jellied sauce on my table by request of some of my young guests. Such great information about the cranberry…I never knew how it got it’s name and I never knew that it was the state fruit of Wisconsin.
    I always keep extra cranberry sauce in my pantry…I love it with my roasted chicken.
    Wishing you and Marion an absolutely Blessed and Happy Thanksgiving!

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    1. And it bounces too, Kathy! Aren't cranberries amazing!!! Thank you for your kind wishes. May you and your loved ones have a glorious Thanksgiving!!!

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  10. Mmmm. I like the idea of a cranberry steamed pudding! Might try that next year.
    Have fun cooking, Louise! Only my daughter this year, so we're dining out!

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    1. Cranberry Steamed Pudding does sound good, doesn't it Barbara. Have FUN dining out!!!

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  11. Great post on cranberries - LOVE the look of that steamed pudding!
    Mary x

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  12. I actually almost bought two bags of cranberries today, and then I stopped and remembered the 6 bags still in my freezer from last year!

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    1. I guess you could say we are "elite" members of the Cranberry Club, Pam, lol...

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  13. The perfect feast of cranberries, Louise! I just LOVE the little cranberry turkey cutouts! Years ago I visited a bog during the harvest season up in Massachusetts - I was always sorry I didn't have a camera with me (it was pre-cell phone days). For years I have made my own cranberry sauce from whole berries, but I must admit I still kind of "relish" that perfect round slice of the cranberry sauce from the can. Hope you and Marion have a wonderful holiday!

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    1. Perhaps one day you will get back there T.W. camera in hand, lol...It seems no matter what kind of cranberry dish is at the table, that ol' reliable canned cranberry sauce must also be present:) Have a GREAT Thanksgiving, T.W!

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  14. Deep fried cranberry sauce!! You have left me speechless.
    Speechless, I say :)

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    1. I know doesn't it sound oh so interesting, Lynn? I may need to try them!

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  15. Hi Louise, I love all your cranberries recipes but have no cranberries here because they are pretty pricey! how lucky that you can buy so many cans at one go:)

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    1. Oh no Jeannie, no cranberries by you? I have a few extra cans, lol...

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  16. I love homemade cranberry sauce/relish, but I'm not sure about most of these recipes. I do want to try the avocado one though... I like "craisins" in my salad, and diced avocado in a salad, so...

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    1. The Chicken Cranberry Salad does sound good, Channon. Give it a try and report back, lol...

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  17. Hi Louise,

    My son and I love love love cranberries in all forms... I wonder if we will like deep fried cranberry sauce??? LOL! Sadly, we have never seen a real cranberry plant before :(

    Zoe

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    1. I have never seen a cranberry plant grow in person either, Zoe. They are pretty choosy about where they will grow, lol...The deep fried cranberry sounds amazing. Perhaps you and your son could try them together:)

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  18. I think that cranberry chicken empanadas would be delish!

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    1. I think so too, Cakelaw. Now when is Empanada Day?

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  19. With eight cans of cranberry sauce, I can see you making lots of these recipes. I bet the fritters do taste like a jelly doughnut. :)

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    1. I bet they do too, Karen. I will be trying them!

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  20. Sounds really good. Thank you for sharing the recipe.

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  21. i love cranberries--sauced, fresh, or dried. i'd like to go bog-wading sometime. :)

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  22. That cranberry chicken salad sounds good; it could be done with tuna, too. I made cranberry sherbet once with jellied cranberries, and I'm betting I posted about it somewhere. As for me, well, I'd eat cranberry sauce with chicken or turkey dinners any day of the week, so even I alone would consume 8 cans with no problem.

    That said, I ordered 2 #10 cans of jellied cranberry sauce for Thanksgiving, plus 4 bags so I can make "the real thing". I might kinda like cranberries, right?

    Happy Thanksgiving!

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  23. Happy Thanksgiving to you and your family my friend!
    Despite it not being a massive tradition in Australia, I am a sucker of cranberries all the time, so your recipes collection are perfect!
    I especially adore the steamed pudding it looks lovely!

    Cheers
    CCU

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  24. Hi ~~louise~~.....
    Holy Moley!!! I never knew there were so many cranberry recipes!
    Not really a fan...but enjoyed seeing all the different recipes!
    Enjoy your week♥
    Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours...
    Cheers!
    Linda :o)

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  25. What a diverse collection of cranberry recipes! I'm just starting to get into it (as it's not something we had growing up) and I'm loving it!^^

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  26. Loved the vintage pictures. The recipes sound wonderful. My favorite is the Cranberry Steamed Pudding. Happy Thanksgiving to you and your family:)

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  27. Such an interesting story Louise! I always learn something new when I visit here! Happy Thanksgiving to you and your family!

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  28. Call me ignorant or what......... never knew cranberry blossom looks like that :) Love these berries! So tasty, yet full of vitamins.

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  29. Happy Thanksgiving to you & your family dear. Hope you're going to have a fabulous time then. ((hugs))
    Blessings, Kristy

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  30. Yes, indeed, Louise, cranberries are big here in Wisconsin! One of my CSAs gets them organic, right off the farm.

    I have also heard they are related to lingonberries, so if I make Swedish pancakes, I may have them with cranberry sauce, lingonberries not being very easy to come by here.

    Have a great Thanksgiving!

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  31. hi louise, oh, i didnt know about the cranberries in jelly form! we have dried cranberries here of course and just saw some fresh cranberries in the supermarket few days ago..which only appears this time of each year. Marion probably already has slots of ideas in her head what to do with the cranberries...:) that simple chicken cranberry empanadas sounds nice to me!

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  32. Thank you for introducing me to the world of cranberries :-)

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  33. Hi Louise, that's a whole lot of cranberries recipes. I can only admire cos we can't get the can type of cranberries in Malaysia. The fresh one are extremely expensive and not often we get to see it in supermarket. Unless we cross over to Singapore to buy. :) Thanks for sharing, the turkey look scrumptious.

    Best regards.

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Through this wide opened gate,
none came too early,
none returned too late.

Thanks for dropping in...Louise