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Sunday, November 17, 2013

Dukkah Bundt Bread Part II

When we last left off, I was telling you about my bread baking experience. Remember, don't get too excited, it was a small step using frozen bread dough:)

Harvested from this book.

I believe I called it, Dukkah Monkey Bread In A Bundt. If you missed the post or need a memory refresher, this year's Bundt Day post is right here.

As I was preparing for today's post, the one where I was going to tell you about my unlikely amalgamation, I realized Dukkah may need further explaining. So, let me tell you about the bread I baked as quickly as possible so we can explore the wonderful world of Dukka. (yes, there are various spellings of this addictive middle eastern spice:)

To my delight, Marion and I are having a house full for Thanksgiving weekend. Naturally, I thought fresh rolls would be a nice accompaniment for all the leftover turkey. Since I lack the creative talent to make home made rolls on my own and Thanksgiving is certainly no time to experiment with such things, I bought a package of Rhodes frozen bread. (beat me with a wet noodle but a girl has to do what she can to please her dining guests:) For the life of me, as I paged through the above Rhodes recipe book, I just couldn't put my finger on just the right recipe. I knew what I wanted and it had to include the Duqqa (yet another spelling:) seasoning mix that I picked up on my last glorious trip to Trader Joe's. So, I found a method in the book that I thought would work and improvised. (the Butterscotch Crown recipe I used is in the previous post)

Basically what I did was thaw the frozen bread in the refrigerator the night before. I was under the impression that it would be all risen and set to go but oh no, it wasn't. I remembered whenever my mother made bread she always put the dough in the stove, unlit of course, and covered it with a towel. That's what I did. Lo and behold a few hours later it had risen! I rolled it out to an 18x10 rectangle. Instead of brushing the dough with butter, brown sugar and cinnamon like the recipe directed, I brushed the dough with Olive Oil, chopped sun dried tomatoes and a sprinkling of hot pepper flakes. I then rolled up the dough just like the recipe said to and cut it into 18 pieces. I then dunked each piece in more Olive Oil, this time with the addition of melted butter, and then into the Dukkah mixture before carefully placing it in a well greased bundt pan. Since this was going to be a bread bundt, I thought my stoneware Pampered Chef Bundt pan was the better choice. The recipe advised baking at 350° for 35-40 minutes. I lowered the temperature to 325° and it worked out great! (I usually lower the temperature when I use the Pampered Chef Bundt, I learned the hard way:)

As I look back on the recipe, I realize I made a rather obvious mistake. Instead of placing the pieces cut side down in the bundt as called for in the recipe, I didn't pay much attention to how they fit in as long as they did. Hence, the slight separation in pieces.

Marion wasn't thrilled with my newly developed "recipe." Actually, she may have enjoyed it more if her tummy didn't have such an aversion to all things seedy. (that darn Diverticulitis) I, however, LOVED it! My very first impression was an Everything Bagel. Have you ever had a warm Everything Bagel? Oh gosh, the lack of Everything Bagels in Pennsylvania could definitely cause a "gal" to move back to Long Island. Well this girl anyway! Not any more, lol...I have my Dukkah Bundt to tie me over:)

Dukkah

In essence, Dukka (DOO-kah) is a mixture of ground roast nuts and spices, originating in Egypt, used for sprinkling on meat or as an olive oil dip.

An Egyptian spice blend comprising toasted nuts and seeds, the combination of which varies depending on the cook. Dukka usually has hazelnuts or chickpeas as a base, along with pepper as well as coriander, cumin and sesame seeds. The ingredients are ground together until the texture is that of a coarse powder. A relative of Za'atar, Dukka is used in Egypt as a table condiment and as a dip for bread.

You may remember, I'm a dunker from way back! One of my very best favorite things to sop up with Italian bread is the "leftover" seasoned olive oil at the bottom of the antipasti bowl. Oh I LOVE it! Dukkah is right up there in flavor. Want to know the best part? (well second best) You can make your very own Duqqa at home. And, it's sooooooooo easy:)

There are lots of variations to the basic recipe. It seems they can be as different as the person who is creating it. I looked through many of my cookbooks trying to find one to share with you today. The one you see above came from a book titled Finger Food Bite-Sized Snacks to Share with Friends edited by Katharine Gasparini. (Laurel Glen Publishing ©2002)

This glossy book of 399 pages has lots of colorful and tempting photographs. The small foods are like non-Spanish tapas, much Mediterranean influence however, and a lot of Asian touches. The book is divided into four groups of Finger Foods: Nibbles, Cold, Hot and Sweet.

After you've made your very own Dukkah, there are so many wonderful "masterpieces" you'll be able to create. You can use it as a crunchy coating for chicken or fish, sprinkle it on salads, you could even make little gift jars of Duqqa. Oh the possibilities are endless. Here, I've gathered up some examples for you to begin your journey.

1. Sesame lamb bites with cacik, homemade dukkah flatbreads and cumin-spiced aubergine
2. Crispy Dukka Flatbreads with Herbed Hummus
3. Flatbread with Dukka (from Epicurious)
4. Roasted Cauliflower & Chard with Chickpeas & Dukka
5. Chicken Skewers with Dukkah Crust
6. Hazelnut Dukka
7. Dukkah (Egyptian Spice Mix)

Before I leave you to explore all those tasty Duqqa links, I would like to mention Alida's Party. If you have never visited Alida's Little Italian Kitchen, drop everything right now and pop on over. Not only is she having her very first online party, you can't imagine the recipes and deliciousness you may be missing. Just look at this gorgeous Apple Rose Cake.

Let's Party!

Enjoy! Louise:)

Oh my, I just realized, not only is today National Baklava Day, it is also Home Made Bread Day! How apropos:)

56 comments:

  1. How did I miss this intriguing spice blend?

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    1. I asked myself the same question Mae. I'm delighted to have found it!

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  2. sigh. all these years and i've been pronouncing it incorrectly. :) your bread looks great!

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    1. I find that hard to believe Grace. You have excellent word skills:)

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  3. I rarely use dukkah, which is silly because it's mighty tasty. Just haven't gotten in the habit of using it, I guess. Great bread! My mom always used to put her dough in the oven to rise, too. These days we use the long rise method, so as often as not ours is in the refrigerator! 24 hours later and it's ready to go. Entertaining post - thanks.

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    1. I was lucky to remember to cover it and put it in the oven to rise, John. The long rise method sounds more my speed.

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  4. I love that you improvise too! I always start with a recipe and then by the time I'm done realize that what I've made has almost nothing in common with the inspiring recipe. It's fun but sometimes really annoying when I want to make the dish again later and have no idea how I actually made it.

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    1. Hi Poppy,

      I use to tell my husband and kids not to like something too much chances were they would never get the exact same thing again, lol...

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  5. Dukkah on bread sounds so good, and I love the idea of a savory monkey bread. I can't believe I'm not baking bread on homemade bread day!

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    1. I can definitely see you checking out Dukkah Lisa...You would go creatively crazy, lol!!!

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  6. Dear Louise, Dukkah sounds wonderful!! I can only imagine how delicious it would be for dipping with olive oil. BTW your bread looks divine. Alida is a wonderful cook and yes, her Apple Rose Cake is a work of art.
    Blessings dear for a beautiful day. Catherine xo

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    1. Oh Catherine, you would love it, dipping it in Olive Oil is insanely delicious!!! Alida cake is so amazing, I just had to share.

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  7. Wow so many things to celebrate today!

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  8. Given that I cannot stand seeds on/in my bread, I think I'm with Marion on this one. Looks great, and I know my FIL would love it... but they're going to Myrtle Beach for the holiday and we'll be at "our" beach, so...

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    1. I had to freeze the rest of it Channon. It may just wind up in the stuffing! It's that time of year again, Thanksgiving at the beach:)

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  9. Very interesting mix of seeds and spices - I can see how you were hooked, Louise! Happy Sunday Night!

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    1. You can't imagine, T.W! When you get back to bread baking, remember Dukkah!

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  10. Hi Louise, I think the dukkah sounds delicious! Your dukkah bundt looks amazing! I'll have to search my pantry for all the ingredients needed when I get home!

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  11. Hi Louise , I'm hooked on Dukkah , good for sopping and I also use it as a rub and Alida cake is just beautiful , thanks for sharing .:) not to hop over to Alida .

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  12. Dear Louise,
    Delightful post! I have never heard of Dukkah, but I think I would love it. So much fun reading your post, there is always something to learn from you. Fabulous job! I will have to get all those ingredients, (which I think I have some of them already) and try it on all kinds of things. Plus like you said the ideas for using this blend are endless. Have to check out Alida's party, Also thank you for sending out a Tweet about my blog post. I also retweeted yours as well! I do hope it went through.
    Blessings for a terrific week, thanks again, Dottie :)

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    1. You are more than welcome, Dottie. You really should try to make some Dukkah. It makes a delicious snack just mixed with oil and dunked, lol...

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  13. I need to make some Dukkah. I love Everything bagels. Time to do some baking.

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  14. I love dukkah and always make sure I have some (homemade) on stock in my pantry. A wonderful bread. Really droolworthy.

    Cheers,

    Rosa

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    1. My next step is to make my own too, Rosa. I LOVE it!

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  15. I am so hungry for Dukkah right now, or any bread at all :D
    Delicious rub!

    Cheers
    CCU

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  16. That apple rose cake is fabulous looking, Louise! Thanks for the link. Will check it out.
    And thanks for the dukkah explanation (and pronounciation)..have read about it, but did not know exactly what it was.
    What fun to have a crowd for Thanksgiving! Only my daughter this year, and she doesn't fly in until 5 PM..so we're eating out. My Florida son works nights in the ER so he's not around this year either. (they try to alternate holidays in the ER)
    Still...we do have fun, just not so much in the kitchen!

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    1. So glad you enjoyed this post Barbara. Sure sounds like you are going to have a tasty Thanksgiving with your daughter. Marion is so excited that her grandkids are coming to visit:)

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  17. I'm so sorry to have missed coming here lately, Louise! I've been busy with all the giveaways & it's my birthday month. Hahaha! I've to admit the Apple Rose Cake is my pick of the day. Have a good week, my dear!

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    1. Not to worry, Shirley. Those give-aways of yours are fabulous!

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  18. The chef! The chef! I want that Chef. How cool is he?! Glad you found your Dukkah mix. The bread really does look good, and I am a big fan of all things "seedy," so this is on my list. Challah today though, the mister wants ti make bread pudding.

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    1. I'm thinking you like that Chef, Pattie, lol...He's my pal:) I LOVE that Dukkah. I can't wait to make my own...

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  19. Dear Louise, I like how your Bundt bread has turned out! Well risen, golden and delicious looking. Just like it should be! I have never heard of Dukkah before, how interesting. And it looks like it can be made at home (I am not sure whether it will be available ready made over here.. surely in London though!). I would like to try it!
    Great tips for the frozen though. We don't always have time to make it on the spot when we need it (especially pizza dough!).
    And a 1000 thanks for your links to the challenge and to the cake. You are a sweetie XX

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    1. It can be made at home, Alida. If you can find the ingredients, you really should try to mix some. You will LOVE it! Maybe even on Pizza!!!

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  20. Yes, I have seen this dukkak at Trader Joe's but did not buy it, not having anything idea of where to use...now it is on my list...thank you so much for all the information.
    Have a wonderful week ahead Louise :D

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    1. The next time you see it, Juliana, give it a try or, make your own!

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  21. I LOVE *love* Dukkah !! Your bread looks awesome!

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  22. I have always been so fascinated with this type of bread. The use of the various spices makes it so appealing.

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  23. Looks scrumptious Louise! I always see this mix at Trader Joe's but had no idea what it is or how to use it. Thanks for the info! Lovely post. :)

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    1. Next time you see it, Anne, maybe you should give it a try. I really like it, a lot!

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  24. Your bread looks like something I would love to try Louise! I have never tried dukkah but looking at its ingredients it is something I would definitely love to add in my bread! Thank you for your kind comment in my blog, I was really touched by the story of your Greek friend!

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    1. Oh how I wish you would try it, Katerina. I really think you would like Dukkah!

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  25. Just wanted to give you my new blog-- www.hillcountryprincess.com!

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    1. Thanks, ducky:) I'll be right there:)

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  26. hi louise, i'm actually imagining you jumping in joy looking at the risen bread..you made it! yay! Looks very good! and thx for sharing the home made dukkah recipe !

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    1. I was so excited, Lena. I'm sure what you are imagining is pretty darn close, lol...

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  27. Hi Louise, very interesting recipe, something new to me. Looking at the Dukkah recipe it sure look awesome. Thanks for sharing this wonderful recipe. Love the apple rose cake, very impressive.

    Best regards.

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    1. So glad you enjoyed it, Amelia. it was such fun!

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Through this wide opened gate,
none came too early,
none returned too late.

Thanks for dropping in...Louise

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