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Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Cookbook Wednesday; Aspic And Old Lace

Aspic and Old Lace
Tomorrow the state of Indiana will be celebrating its admittance to the United States in 1816 as the 19th state of the union. I can’t think of a better way to celebrate both Indiana’s anniversary and Cookbook Wednesday than with one of my very best favorite cookbooks; Aspic and Old Lace. If you enjoy reading cookbooks like I do, you will LOVE this book. Aspic and Old Lace: Ten Decades of Cooking, Fashion, and Social History, which was published in 1987 by the Northern Indiana Historical Society in celebration of its 120th anniversary, is a true labor of love!
Indiana Historical Society
The Northern Indiana Center for History is the headquarters of the Northern Indiana Historical Society, the second-oldest historical society in Indiana, which was established in 1867 to collect and interpret the history of the northern Indiana region by St. Joseph County's leading citizens. The history museum occupies several buildings and includes areas dedicated to the history of the St. Joseph River Valley, the University of Notre Dame, the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League, and the Kidsfirst Children's Museum. The Studebaker National Museum, which holds a large collection of wagons and automobiles from the 150-year history of the Studebaker Corporation, is adjacent to the Northern Indiana Center for History. The former South Bend mansion of Clement Studebaker, named Tippecanoe Place, is now a restaurant.
I should warn you, this post may be a bit graphic intensive:) I just couldn’t help myself. I really wanted you to get a taste of all this book’s offerings. Not only does this cookbook offer a glimpse into the heritage of the St. Joseph River Valley Region of Northern Indiana and Southern Michigan with recipes but also with reflections of fashions, vintage advertisements, photographs and so much more. Many of the recipes include personal narratives from those who contributed the recipes. But, I’m getting ahead of myself, first take a look at the table of contents.
Aspic And Old Lace | Indiana Cookbook
I can’t even begin to imagine the amount of time and energy that went into compiling all 194 pages of this book. I would love to show you each and every page but we know that’s not going to happen. Instead I’ve chosen to start at the beginning in 1870. Enjoy:)
Mrs. Schuyler Colfax
Aspic And Old Lace | Indiana Cookbook | 1870s recipes
Now for some festive recipes and household hints from the 1870s:)

Hot Water GingerbreadHousehold Links
Speeding right along, now we have a selection from the 1960s. I’m telling you, if you ever see this book reasonably priced, buy it! If not for the recipes but for the wealth of information it has bound within. I probably should have scanned a few Studebaker recipes for you car fans out there. Maybe next time:) Enjoy the 60s:)
Aspic And Old Lace | Indiana Cookbook
I couldn’t decide if wanted to share 60s recipes or 50s recipes so, I chose one of each!
Christmas Casserole Cookies
Thank you for visiting Cookbook Wednesday. If you would like to share a cookbook, we would love to have you join us. Just enter below.
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Resources
1. Don't Miss the Northern Indiana Center for History in South Bend, Indiana (a blogger shares a recent visit)





42 comments:

  1. I think you managed an entire Indiana history post without once using the term "Hoosier"! The vintage clothes and recipes are really fun. Next time, Studebakers.

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    1. I will dig out the Studebaker recipes, Mae. Perhaps in time for Clement Studebaker's birthday in March:)

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  2. Louise I love this post! All vintage recipes is a really lovely post dear!:)
    xo

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    1. Thanks Gloria, so glad you enjoyed it...

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  3. What a fun post! And Christmas Casserole cookies? Never heard of a casserole cookie before, but really like the idea. Swell stuff today -- thanks so much.

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    1. Thanks John...Yes doesn't that casserole sound intriguing:) Must try it someday...

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  4. I love reading these recipes! Thank you for sharing, Louise!

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  5. What a fun cookbook. I couldn't imagine wearing that heavy & ornate dress like Mrs. Colfax! The hot water gingerbread recipe sounds pretty tasty.

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    1. Isn't that dress something Pam. I would wear but only to try it on, lol...

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  6. So fun! Man, I wish butter was still 49 cents a pound. It's closer to $4.99 a pound these days. Sigh.

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    1. The prices are pretty amazing aren't they Eva. I suppose it's all relative:)

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  7. Dear Louise, This is the type of book that I simply want to try it all!! I love the recipes especially from the 1800's.
    Have a great day and stay cozy and warm and all my best to Marion. xo Catherine

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    1. Aren't those earlier recipes a hoot, Catherine. I'd love to try them as they are:)

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  8. Hmmm....so, everyone needs to buy in the type of quantities I'd have when everyone was at home. Don't seal up my molasses barrel....check! I just love reading the old time household hints and recipes. This is a great cookbook, Louise; thanks for showing it to us! My entry is seasonally appropriate. I hope you like mine, too.

    Hope you and Marion are staying warm and cozy. AT least you missed the snow, which wasn't as bad as all that hereabouts, either.

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    1. I LOVE your entry Marjie. Beard bread baked by you how could i not!!! Uh, we didn't miss the snow as much as I had expected but, it is mostly gone now, thank goodness:)

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  9. Hi Louise , you did it again . Giving insight to times passed , but still making it enjoyable to read . After the holidays I will have to try these recipes .... pinning . Thanks for sharing and (((HUGS))) to you and Marin :)

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    1. I didn't do a thing, Nee. It's all in the pages of this wonderful book. Thanks for pinning Nee...

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  10. I love all of these vintage recipes. It is so much fun reading recipes of years-gone by. Thanks so much for posting;)

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  11. Hi Louise,
    You are 'speedy' ! From 1870s to 1960s ha ha! The Hot Water Gingerbread looks easy to bake and an interesting recipe Casserole Cookies you've shared here. Thanks so much ^-^! Have a great week ahead !

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    1. So glad you enjoyed it, Karen. Try that Gingerbread and let us know!

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  12. Dear Louise, What a fun post. I love the old cookbooks and this one is definitely a good one. Never knew this info on Indiana. You are not only sharing your love for cookbooks, recipes, but also a history lesson. I love the recipes especially the old ones. But what really got me was the fact of the 1950's prices of foods. I was born in 1954 and can you imagine the price of milk, bread, etc. We will never see those again. Thank you for sharing...Great post! Have a blessed week...Dottie :)

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    1. Aren't those prices something, Dottie, lol...If only they were still the same:)

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  13. Lovely post dear.. Love all your vintage recipes.. Thanks for sharing. Hope you having a wonderful week.

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  14. Hi Louise! Such a wonderful post. I madly love to read cookbooks...this one so good with all those classic dishes. Thank you for sharing your joy with us!! And a thank you for such a lovely and encouraging comment on my ravioli post :)

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    1. Thank YOU, Jayanthi! Your ravioli look delicious. You did an awesome job!

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  15. Haha we really are going back in time now! But I love the vintage 1870s recipes you have posted, just makes you wonder how these recipes have changed or not to be the classic ones we make today :D

    Cheers
    Choc Chip Uru

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    1. Funny you should say that urn. I was thinking about finding exact recipes (or pretty close) from different eras and comparing. I should one day:)

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  16. This is such a fun post Louise...the price of the ingredients really caught my attention...so interesting!
    Thanks for the post my dear...hope you are having a fantastic week :)

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  17. What a fun post! Aspic and Old lace, but being a mystery person, arsenic would have been o.k., too.. LOL.. Thanks for linking me to Cookbook Wednesday. I tried to figure out the linky, but I'm challenged!

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  18. i love the title and i'm proud of myself for understanding the reference! aspic gives me the heebie-jeebies, but i know some folks are trying to bring it back into restaurant rotation. interesting post, louise!

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  19. What a marvelous cookbook from my home state! Had to giggle at the household hints...and those Christmas casserole cookies don't sound too bad at all :) Have a terrific weekend!

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  20. I love the title of this cookbook, and what fun recipes and hints to read. I hope to be joining you next week!

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  21. What a fun cookbook. I love books like these because they are a great glimpse of the past. Clarice

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  22. What a lovely post, Louise! The household hint is very interesting! Buying rye in small quantities of forty or fifity pounds! I cannot imagine how much is their large quantities! Interesting indeed!
    With so much to read, other than recipes, this is a gem of a heritage cookbook!
    Thanks for sharing!

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  23. what a great book!!!
    i can imagine how this book exist before the internet and stuffs....

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  24. Hi Louise, those household hints are priceless, and some of those recipes sound delicious, love your cookbook Wednesdays!

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  25. Okay, THAT is my favorite title of the day! My grandmother was an aspic and lace queen, so maybe that's why I adore it so! (The title... not aspic. I'm not a fan.)

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  26. Very interesting. I don't know much about American history. Here is my chance to learn more! The recipes all sound good! xx

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  27. Okay I actually had to look up "aspic". Nice picture on wikipedia, though I still would hesitate to try it.

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Through this wide opened gate,
none came too early,
none returned too late.

Thanks for dropping in...Louise

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