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Sunday, February 16, 2014

I'm Going Junketing

Junket Booklet 1928
Don't be sad, I won't be gone for very long. I'm just taking the next two weeks to get some things done around the house and to regroup. I especially want to get some planting done. Yes, I know, if you were to look out my window last night, you wouldn't be thinking about planting a thing. I, however, have big plans for this year's garden and it's time to do some planning and planting; indoors of course:) This will be the first year that I will be growing veggies in a very long time. I'm so excited!
Have you ever heard of SproutRobot? SproutRobot lets you know when to plant and sends you seeds if you want them to. I only use it as a guideline for planting time. You enter your zip code click get started and a screen comes up requesting you join. I didn't want to join but I did want to see their guidelines so, I just clicked that little X in the corner so it would go away and I could get down to business. (they don't know I'm telling you about them, I just figured I'd share:)
I actually started planning the vegetable garden during last year's growing season. You wouldn't believe the charts, catalogs and magazines and other "stuff" I have lingering all over the place. Yes, the cookbooks have finally been put back on the shelves and the gardening books have taken over.
There are more gardening books and magazines out in the shed but, it doesn't look like I'll be heading out there any time soon. I did try to clear the back driveway a bit but I didn't get very far. I made my way back to the bird feeders before this last snowstorm but I wasn't sure if the birdies and rabbits would get the goods so I put out two plates for each of them. However, it snowed again and they are covered. That's the bump you see in the middle of my clearing. BTW, if you're in need of resources for planning your garden this year, just check out my garden pinterest board, there's tons of resources even some suggestions for getting free garden catalogs.
jun·ket [juhng-kit] noun
1. a sweet, custardlike food of flavored milk curdled with rennet.
2. a pleasure excursion, as a picnic or outing.
3. a trip, as by an official or legislative committee, paid out of public funds and ostensibly to obtain information.
verb (used without object)
4. to go on a junket.
verb (used with object)
5. to entertain; feast; regale.
Now, about that junket. As I said, I'm not going far. Actually, I'll be sticking in my neck of the woods the entire time. I wouldn't dream of leaving Marion to fend for herself in this weather:) Despite the fact that she has these guys to keep her safe and warm:)
Although, if she really got bored, she could always play with this Party and Painting Book distributed by "The Junket Folks" in 1928.
Junket Party and Painting Book for Children | 1928
Isn't it adorable? It's a small book. It only measures 4" X 6" and it's in perfect condition! I just have to show you the contents. But, before I do, I must ask, do you have fond memories of Junket Desserts?
Junket Party and Painting Book for Children | 1928
Chances are you have been exposed to some sort of rennet culture if you have recently enjoyed some "deliciously creamy yogurt, mouth-watering Italian style salami or a cheese with a distinct bite?" The story of the Junket begins in Denmark in 1874, when Christian Hansen founded Hansen's Laboratorium in Denmark to make a commercial rennet extract for the cheese making industry. The company is still in business. I think I've even seen Junket Dessert Custard at the grocery store.
...While waiting for an interview with the merchant, he [Christian Hansen] heard an order mentioned which came in from the country calling for a dozen of rennets. "What is that," he asked.  "Oh," was the reply, "rennets are calves' stomachs prepared for cheese making, the farmers soak them in whey and add the liquid to the milk to curdle it."  Why couldn't a commercial extract be made in the laboratory, our young chemist thought, and be put on the market? After obtaining some more information as to the quantity used, etc., he bid his friend goodbye, forgetting the question as to his own future. During the next few months he investigated the matter in the diaries where cheese was made, and worked in the laboratory until he had perfected an extract of high keeping quality, uniform strength and free from the contaminating impurities characteristic of the - often foul - liquid of uncertain coagulating power produced by soaking the stomachs in whey in the dairy. With samples of his new preparation young Hansen again called on the merchant who entered into the proposition with enthusiasm and offered him the cellar under his office for a factory. This was the beginning of "Chr. Hansen's Laboratory." Whether the story is true or not, it is characteristic of the man. It was, however, not by an accident that commercial Rennet Extract was invented, but due to the unusual foresight and clever grasp of the situation, of an eminent student with a clear head and practical sense for possibilities presented. And it was not until many difficulties had been overcome by undaunted energy and persistency that success was obtained...
The use of rennet quickly spread in Denmark. However, in America, cheese makers were a bit skeptical. (The New England Cheesemaking Supply Company does NOT recommend Junket for cheese making)
...At such an incident in America, a man in the audience suddenly got up claiming that the "patent rennet," as it was called at the time, contained poisonous acids. Christian Hansen immediately grabbed the glass of liquid rennet in front of him and emptied it in a few swallows. The man hardly believed his own eyes, but definitely gained faith in the product. There was, however, one slight side effect to Christian Hansen’s determined action. For several days afterwards he suffered from a tremendous thirst caused by the high content of salt in the rennet...
Little Falls NY | Junket
At first, rennet was imported from Denmark, but in 1891 a factory was constructed in Little Falls, New York. Junket actually means "milk with rennet" and was the inspiriation for the name. The tablets were designed for household use of making cheese and other dairy products. In 1911, Hansen began marketing a powder under the brand name 'Nesnah,' which is Hansen spelled backwards. It was sweetened and flavored for making custards and drinks and not much different from today's Junket Rennet Custard. In 1915, the brand name was changed to Junket. I am very fortunate to have an undated die-cut booklet with the Nesnah name.
Nesnah Dessert Powder Die-cut undatedNesnah Dessert Powder Die-cut undated
I actually have a couple of Junket booklets but unfortunately, I will not be able to share them all with you today. (this post is lengthy as it is:)
Junket Booklets
Did you notice the one in the middle from the Junket Food Exhibit at the 1939 World's Fair? It is in the least desirable condition and exactly like the one in front titled How to Make Rennet Custards and Ice Cream.
Junket World's Fair 1939 Booklet
Ready to see the rest of that Party and Painting Book? I'm only going to show you the colorized pages but I have to tell you, I think it's kinda cool that the rest of the pages have not been colored in yet:)
Junket BookletJunket BookletJunket Booklet
Junket BookletJunket BookletJunket Booklet
I hope you enjoyed today's post as much as I did sharing it. It looks like the day has once again gotten away from me so I'll be heading to the kitchen now to prepare dinner. I will be back later to visit your delicious blogs before I begin my Junket. Enjoy! Louise:)
Junket Booklet

43 comments:

  1. Hello Louise, This is a lovely post and as your other posts I liked the ideas and new terminology used here. Its always a good learning being here at your webpage. Please come back soon as we all will be missing you and your posts. I am looking forward to planting herbs and veggies in my post too, but getting recurring snow storms and chill at our side. Shall wait for another week or so and get back to them. Take care and have fun in your activities. Stay warm
    Much Love, sonia

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  2. Oh, Louise, what a wonderful post! I grew up with Junket... haven't heard that word in years. love all the vintage cookbooks, too.. rennet! Not to make you envious, but my roses are all leafed out, my magnolia started blooming in December! What a topsy-turvy season.. all over the world. See you in two weeks!

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  3. We'll miss you! But two weeks isn't long, and it'll probably take us that long to digest all that wonderful rennet info.Have fun with garden delights!

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  4. Hi Louise , you deserve to take a little time to go 'Junketing' you will be missed but time goes by quickly when you having fun . I am planning my garden also , as you say in this weather ;-D . This post is a wonderful post and I always learn something new , thanks my friend . My herbs that is in small planters I bring inside , I put them in the foyar and on the patio (enclosed) I hope you have a nice junketing and we will be here when you return .
    P.S. I will try to find Marion another recipe while you are away ;-D I am so bad , thanks for sharing .:)

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  5. oh goodness your snowy yard looks quite grim if you were fancying going outside for a walk - but I guess it is too cold anyway - but it does have a certain peace too if you are happy to snuggle up inside.

    I confess I quiver at the word junket - I have never liked milk much and the idea of junket brings back unpleasant childhood memories of finding it for dessert - but it is very interesting to hear about it's history.

    Enjoy your break and good luck with the garden

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  6. Ah, yes, the 2014 planting. I'm just heading out this morning to pitch in on onion seeding. It's a little hard to get my head around it all with a food of snow on the ground! You know, Louise, I had never heard of Junket. I guess I was a Jello baby? And, of course, we had all the free cookbooks that went with that brand!

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  7. I have never had Junket though the box looks familiar. My grandparents were from Denmark so I'll have to ask my mom about it. Also a great reminder that I need to be thinking about my garden. It does seem hard to believe now!

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  8. Enjoy your break! I was thinking of starting a veggie garden this year too.

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  9. I'll miss you, Louise! Come back sooooon!!

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  10. Enjoy your planting Louise! The junket book is adorable.

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  11. Your yard looks a lot like mine. I'm thinking of taking pictures in the pan of my driveway, between the mountains the plow guy left behind....when he finally got here after midnight on Saturday. Poor fella. I heated up some soup and gave it to him. I felt bad that he'd been working all day Friday and Saturday.

    Have a fun break. Regroup, recharge, and maybe watch some melting take place!

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  12. Enjoy your deserved break lovely Louise! Thank you for this lovely post as always XXX

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  13. Linda historia Louise el patio con nieve se ve hermoso y aquì estamos con mucha calor 33 grados diariamente, tambièn me agrada mucho saludos y buen descanso,abrazos.

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  14. You are so good to be planning your garden now. We always have the best of intentions but usually just end up planting in a very haphazard way. Checking out your pinterest board now. :)

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  15. Enjoy your break. Everyone deserves a break to just be themselves. Have fun.

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  16. Never heard of Junket the food. Do enjoy your recharging! Maybe some melting will happen too?

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  17. Dear Louise,
    Fabulous post as usual! You definitely need some "Louise time". Sometimes a break is a good thing, you get to see things clearer. I hope that you enjoy your time, and most of all have fun. Your post on Junket brings back many memories of when I was little, my grandmother used to make Junket. As soon as I saw your photo of the box, it all came back to me. Had no idea about Mr. Hansen and the origin of the Junket. I didn't even know they started in Little Fall, NY..It is so much fun reading your post and learning so much. I can appreciate all the research you did! Love the party and painting book. I also remember my dad making Ricotta cheese and he would use rennet in making it. Love the gardening idea. I have no green thumb at all, but I love fresh veggies and fruits straight from the garden. I know it takes time and planning for a garden to grow and starting early is very proactive. I give you credit for that. Thanks for sharing your info, and enjoy your "Junket" time!
    Blessings... Dottie :)

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  18. Junket is a new one on me. Maybe it's regional. Enjoy your time off. Boy could I use some time off. From EVERYONE!

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  19. Oh no Louise! I'm just now discovering your wonderful blog and you are off on a junket! I hope you enjoy your time away. We all need that break. (I know that I've been neglecting things around my home lately!). I'm glad to see you are a gardener, I'll be sure to follow you because I need all the help I can get in that area. Thanks for the link and I'll be sure to check out Sprout Robot. Loved reading your vintage literature about junket. I enjoyed my visit here today and look forward to your return! : )

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  20. Louise , I thought you've already had a vegetable garden :D Yeah , fresh veggies and herbs sounds wonderful ! I love the sound of that SproutRobot ! Gonna check that out , who cares if I can't even grow mint to save my life lol Junket and it pertains to food ?! I never knew that :D Enjoy your "staycation" !

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  21. I LOVED junket when I was a kid! this reminds me of it. my fave treat. thanks so much for the trip down memory lane!

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  22. Louise, I will certainly check out that site SproutRobot site. It’s very cool! We just planted butter lettuce, carrots and strawberries this weekend. Started seeds for tomatoes, peppers and eggplant in little peat pots which are sitting inside where it’s warmer. My goodness, you are buried in snow!!
    Love the Junket part of the post too. Brings back memories. My mom always made the vanilla and chocolate and we all loved it.

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  23. Dear Louise, I do remember Junket desserts. I loved them as a kid.
    I will tell my daughter of the Sprout Robot. She loves to plant and garden.
    I hope you stay safe and warm and rested. I will look forward to your return.
    Blessings dear. Catherine xo

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  24. We always had junket in the drawer full of boxes in my mother's kitchen. She never had a sprout robot though! Those photos of the garden make me wonder how you'll grow anything in the snow. :)

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  25. I never heard of junket...until now...and it sure look easy to have a nice dessert in no time :D
    Enjoy your outdoor time...stay warm and see you in a couple of week Louise.

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  26. Hi Louise,

    I have never seen Junket before!!! Are the products still available now in US? I amazed with the fact that you managed to find all these Junket booklets which look kind of extremely rare to me!!! The coloured illustrations are so cool!!!

    Btw about Kit, have you receive any reply from her? No for me. Will communicate via email regarding this...

    Zoe

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  27. My husband talks about having Junket when he was young but I never saw it growing up in Texas. Enjoy your time planning and planting for your garden. I can't start my seeds until next month as nothing can go in the ground in Maine until the end of May. :)

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  28. I don't know if my last comment went through…I won't repeat it except to wish you a nice couple of weeks planning and planting. :)

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  29. i never knew junket had other definitions, how fun! enjoy your little break. :)

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  30. I will miss you Louise so much! but enjoy your break:))) xxxx

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  31. Oh Louise, This is a wonderfully interesting post! My mom always used rennet tablets to make cheese and we often had Junket for dessert growing up! It was one of my favorites…plain vanilla!
    I haven’t even thought of my garden yet…you are a better women than I am! However, I can’t wait till spring, the clean up and planting! Have a great break! Can’t wait till you are back!

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  32. Those colorized pages would make great postcards!

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  33. I hope you will make the best out of this break Louise and I know sometimes we do need a little break form blogging. I hope you will complete all the things you have scheduled and you will also find some time to have some fun too. All work without fun is not good! Take care and see you soon!

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  34. Hi Louise,
    I have not heard of Junket! And I have been on a lookout for Rennet for ages. Obviously cheese making is not a common thing around here, and this is a difficult ingredient to find. The only way is to order from online, but again, it is extremely costly!
    But I'm not giving up yet!
    Hope your plans for your garden will turn out well as planned!
    The only plants that are doing OK in mine are the pineapple plants! I have just discarded my wilted basil plants and thymes today. Will be planting new ones these few days! The weather here is terribly hot, and have not been raining for quite sometime, if this goes on, there will be water rationing, which I hope would not happen!
    Enjoy your junketing! I could use some of your snow right now!

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  35. And now I'm in the mood for some nice junket. I don't think I've ever actually had official Junket but I had heard of it. Your collection of junket booklets is impressive, Louise. Don't know where you find all your treasures :)

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  36. Hi Louise, yeah, how nice to have your own homegrown veggies and herbs, right? Do enjoy your outdoor gardening and Happy planting:)

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  37. I love the cartoons of the little girl!

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  38. Have a lovely break. I have not heard the term junket for a long time. Thank you for the reminder. Clarice

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  39. My poor herb garden has been neglected for so long. I really need to get outside and give it some attention. Can't wait to see your garden full of vegetables!

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  40. Thanks for introduce me to the concept of 'junketing', I hope you have a blast enjoying regrouping and planting :D

    Cheers
    Choc Chip Uru

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  41. I have a kind of creepy antique print that is entitled "The Little Junketer" - I'll have to take a photo of it, it is really interesting.

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Through this wide opened gate,
none came too early,
none returned too late.

Thanks for dropping in...Louise

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